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Next Event:

Thursday, July 9, 2015 | 6pm — 10pm
Center Theater
Long Beach Convention Center

Thank you for making our January 6 Agenda Emerge a successful event. Take a look at some of the press coverage received:
CNET, Apparel News, CBS, Highsnobiety, GQ, Hypebeast, Nice Kicks, USA Today, Los Angeles Times, Rolling Stone, and MTV.

About Agenda Emerge:

AGENDA Emerge, powered by Group Y, is a creative and brand building conference featuring today's most iconic creative directors, industry leaders and entrepreneurs in the youth marketplace. A highly curated platform where industry insights and business intricacies are shared.

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AGENDA Emerge, powered by Group Y, is a creative and brand building conference featuring today's most iconic creative directors, industry leaders and entrepreneurs in the youth marketplace. A highly curated platform where industry insights and business intricacies are shared.

January 2015 Photos

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July 2013 Video Recap

Creative Director, Hurley
@hurley @ryanhurley

Ryan Hurley

From a young age Ryan Hurley has been at the cross roads of design and surfing. From the birth of Hurley’ s Phantom board shorts to the working with the Nike Innovation Kitchen Ryan’s has always had a strong connection to innovation and problem solving throughout design. Ryan is currently the creative director for Hurley where he leads all innovation and design.

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Co-founder, Herschel Supply Co.
@lyndoncormack @herschelsupply

Lyndon Cormack

Lyndon Cormack was born in the foothills of the Rockies, and he hasn't stood still since. His childhood was spent on bikes, skateboards, snowboards, skates, and in pairs of shoes that were inevitably worn through from hiking and exploring. A few days after his eighteenth birthday, Lyndon’s desire to explore reached a global scale, sending him through Australia and all over Asia.

Travelling aligned him with other individuals cut from a similar cloth, a few of which got him involved with the sales side of skateboarding, snowboarding and biking. Eventually Lyndon found himself in Vancouver, Canada, where he called a different set of foothills home.

Lyndon is one of two founding brothers of the Herschel Supply Company - a key influencer in the importance of the backpack as an everyday fashion accessory. Named after a small town in Saskatchewan, Canada, where three generations of the Cormack family grew up, the Herschel brand was founded in 2009 and hasn’t stood still since. Now positioned as a global accessories brand, Herschel Supply products are designed in Canada and sold in the foothills of the Rockies, as well as Australia, Asia and other countries around the world.

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VP of Design & Special Projects, Nike
@Nike

Tinker Hatfield

After 33 years at Nike, Tinker Hatfield is the most recognized sneaker designer in the world. While applying his architectural talent to designing performance shoes and using his entrepreneurial flair to market them, he has experienced and leads the charge in evolving footwear design innovation. Inspired by motorcycles, race cars, rock concerts and more often than not, just talking to people on the street, Hatfield believes good design is appropriate for its time and place, as well as represents a little futurism too. During his three decades at global sports brand Nike, he's turned athlete connection into an art form.

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Founder of Hurley
@hurley

Bob Hurley

For Bob Hurley, it all started with the desire to make a better surfboard. Working closely with the best up-and-coming surfers in Huntington Beach and world champions like Rabbit Bartholomew, the Hurley label quickly became synonymous with the best high-performance shortboards on offer. Combining youth energy with a relentless drive to make surfing better, Bob seamlessly ventured into the apparel business, growing Billabong USA in the ’80s and ’90s to $100M before starting his own brand — Hurley — in 1999. For Bob, Hurley was more than an apparel company — it was an innovative, inclusive hub for every young creative mind with an affinity for the ocean. After partnering with Nike in 2002, Bob continues his mission of making Hurley the world’s most forward-thinking surf brand and a global Microphone for Youth.

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Craig Stecyk

C. R. Stecyk III is a multimedia artist widely acknowledged as a major influence within the genres of graffiti and street art. He has participated in numerous international exhibitions and his work is included in a number of public collections. A surfboard shaped and painted by Stecyk resides in the permanent archive of the Smithsonian. He was also a writer and production designer on the Sundance award-winning documentary film Dogtown and Z-Boys. C.R. is one of the founders of Juxtapoz art magazine, and has written for many different periodicals, books and catalogs. Stecyk was involved with the founding of the Zephyr surf shop in Santa Monica, California where the boards he painted helped to establish the graphic styles of both surfing and skateboarding. He also created characteristic icons of surfing and skateboarding such as the Zephyr moon, the "Vato Rat", the Dogtown cross and the “Skate and Destroy” marks.

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Shepard Fairey

Shepard Fairey is the artist behind OBEY GIANT, the graphics that have changed the way people see art and the urban landscape. What started with an absurd sticker he created in 1989 while studying at the Rhode Island School of Design has since evolved into a worldwide street art campaign, as well as an acclaimed body of fine art.

The OBEY GIANT campaign is rooted in the DIY counterculture of punk rock and skateboarding, but it has also taken cues from popular culture, commercial marketing and political messaging. Fairey steeps his ideology and iconography in the self-empowerment of those who refuse to be manipulated by the machine of manufactured consent. With biting sarcasm verging on reverse psychology, he goads viewers, using the imperative “obey,” to take heed of the propagandists out to bend the world to their agendas.

In 2003, Fairey founded Studio Number One, a creative firm dedicated to applying his ethos wherever art and enterprise intersect. Building from Fairey’s approach to design striking, thought-provoking work, the company has since evolved into its own creative entity and become one of the top boutique agencies in the country.

Fairey’s art reached a new height of prominence in 2008, when his “HOPE” portrait of Barack Obama became the iconic image of the presidential campaign and helped inspire an unprecedented political movement. The original image now hangs in the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.

Along with the Obama campaign, Fairey has also donated artwork and made contributions to charitable organizations such as the ACLU, MoveOn, Hope for Darfur, the Chiapas Relief Fund, marriage equality reform, 11th Hour Action, Hurricane Katrina relief, the Art of Elysium, Southern California fire relief, shelters for L.A. teens, children’s charities in Iraq and the U.S., Free the West Memphis 3, Feeding America, Adopt-a-Pet.com and the Rush Philanthropic Arts Foundation.

As Fairey’s body of work reached its 20-year mark in 2009, the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston honored him with a full-scale solo retrospective, which drew a record number of visitors for the museum. Entitled Supply and Demand, the exhibit shares its name with Fairey’s career-chronicling book. After its time in Boston, the Supply and Demand exhibition made additional runs at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, PA, and the Center for Contemporary Art in Cincinnati, OH, also breaking attendance records in both museums. In May 2010, Fairey unveiled a new collection of work, entitled MAY DAY, through Deitch Projects as the world-renowned gallery’s final project. In 2011 Shepard was featured in the Art in the Streets exhibition at the MoCA Geffen in Los Angeles and in 2012 he had his first solo exhibition in London in 5 years, entitled Sound &Vision. Fairey had his first major exhibition in his hometown of Charleston, S.C. at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art alongside Jasper Johns in May of 2014 and in 2015 he has a scheduled solo exhibition at the CAC Malaga, Spain.

Kicking off in 2014, Fairey launched the inaugural Art Alliance art show; as the founder and curator of the show, he handpicked the 40 plus acclaimed international artists for the exhibition, which took place alongside the Lollapalooza Music Festival.

In addition to his guerilla street works, as of 2014, Fairey has painted 40 large-scale murals around the world.

For more on Shepard Fairey and OBEY GIANT, please visit OBEYGIANT.com

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Lead Singer of Social Distortion
@mikeness @socialdistortion

Mike Ness

Mike Ness is an artist that encompasses the true essence of an Americana Original. Known as a legendary member of the early Southern California punk movement with his band Social Distortion, Ness has become a Rock ‘n’ Roll Icon that has had an impactful career in music that spans four decades. Ness has truly evolved to portray a variety of musical styles that reflects his soul in each of his albums. A passionate songwriter and storyteller, Ness crafts authenticity, depth, humanity and raw emotion into his profound lyrics. His symbolic style and allusive image have gained him loyalists of all generations. Always staying true to his self and core values Ness continues to breathe panache into everything this ambitious, true working class hero encounters.

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Title
@ohsosocial

Test Speaker

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Marc Eckō

Once a graffiti artist with no connections or fashion pedigree, Marc Eckō left the safety net of pharmacy school to start his own company. Armed only with hustle, sweat equity and creativity, he flipped a $5,000 bag of cash into a global corporation now worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Eckō is an American fashion designer, entrepreneur, investor and artist. He is the founder of Marc Eckō Enterprises, a global fashion and lifestyle company. He is also the founder and chairman of Complex Media, the world’s leading provider of fashion, entertainment, lifestyle, and product trends to young male tastemakers. Complex Media Network includes 110+ websites that generate more than 700 million page views and 70 million unique visitors per month. Eckō serves as an emeritus board member to the Council of Fashion Designers of America, Big Picture Learning, Tikva Children’s Home and Everloop. Marc lives in NJ with his wife and three kids.

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Bobby Hundreds

As an illustrator, writer, photographer, and designer, Bobby Kim aka Bobby Hundreds is the first to admit, “I do a little bit of everything, and a lot of nothing.” Recognized by Inc. Magazine’s 30 under 30 issue as well as a cover story with the New York Times Magazine, the Co-Founder and Chief Creative Officer of The Hundreds grew an independent, Los Angeles-based creative project into a worldwide apparel label, fueled by his prolific online presence and strategic brand narrative. Celebrating 10 years of business, The Hundreds now holds four flagship stores, a dynamic online magazine read by millions, a print magazine, and footwear program, right in line with the company’s motto: “The Hundreds is Huge.”

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Jeff Staple

In 1997, jeffstaple walked into the Triple Five Soul boutique in New York City and received his first order of 12 silkscreened t-shirts – and Staple was officially open for business. What started as a small t-shirt line handmade by jeffstaple, who was then a student at Parsons School of Design, grew organically and began to gain visibility in the city. In the process of building this burgeoning brand, Nike hired jeffstaple in 2005 to create a special sneaker to represent New York. The Staple Pigeon icon was conceived and was branded on the heels of a limited (and now most coveted) 150 pairs of the popular Dunk Pro SB, leading to much fanfare upon its release and exposing sneaker culture, and Staple, to the masses. The Staple Pigeon is now a world renowned symbol which reflects the gritty and reckless energy New Yorkers (and all urban dwellers) possess. It not only exists as a representation of New York but is also the influence behind Staple’s extensive apparel range and collaborative products distributed in the top retailers across the globe. Inspired by street culture and design, Staple’s reach encompasses many different landscapes such as music, art, and fashion.

15+ years later, Staple continues to be a positive social contagion.

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Johnny Cupcakes

Why have thousands of customers from around the world chosen to get the Johnny Cupcakes' logos tattooed on themselves? How does Johnny get hundreds of people to camp outside his faux-bakeries? Over the past decade Johnny Cupcakes, founded by speaker Johnny Earle, has grown from a small idea to a multimillion dollar, highly exclusive t-shirt brand driven by a community of worldwide collectors. Johnny shares his story of how he took his t-shirts from the trunk of his rusty car at age 19—with a learning disability and little to no start up money—to opening shops in some of the world's most sought after locations.

In this session, Johnny will piece together how his success reinforces the power of details, experience and loyalty. Through his inspiring, and certainly unpredictable journey, Johnny exudes the fundamental connection between the person and the brand. Johnny's presentation provides comprehensive blueprints for getting any small company, passion or idea off the ground—while reinventing how you do it.

Johnny has been recognized for his innovative business strategies where he has been named America's #1 Young Entrepreneur by BusinessWeek and featured on NPR, MTV, WIRED, Wall Street Journal, & as a case study in numerous text books.

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Greg Selkoe

Greg Selkoe is the CEO and owner of streetwear retailer Karmaloop.com.  He was born and raised in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston. Selkoe has a Masters in Public Policy from the Kennedy School at Harvard University. Selkoe started his career as an Urban Planner for the city of Boston (Boston Redevelopment Authority) before he started Karmaloop.com in 2000. Realizing the need for a global streetwear provider Selkoe started the company in his parents’ basement at age 25. Karmaloop.com has become the largest online streetwear retailer in the world, with over 500 brands, and selling in over 45 countries. Karmaloop Inc. encompasses several other websites including: KarmaloopTV.com, PLNDR.com, BoylstonTrading.com, BrickHarbor.com,  MissKL.com and 5 private label clothing brands. The combined site traffic is over 8 million monthly unique visitors with an opt-in email list of 4 million. KarmaloopTV.com their wildly popular online video channel is doing roughly 4 million video views a month. Karmaloop’s YouTube channel is 1 of 100 premium channels on YouTube. The media sites cover a variety of topics through shows and interviews with the key influencers and celebrities. Greg Selkoe has been invited to speak to 2000 young people at the Generation Now Event as part of the January 2013 Inauguration of President Obama. In 2012 Selkoe was awarded the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award in the Ecommerce Category for N.E., In 2010 Selkoe signed on to be a contributor to the Huffington Post. In 2009 Selkoe was selected as one of the top 25 most influential entrepreneurs under 35 in the United States and was invited to participate in a White House summit for young business leaders.

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Keith Hufnagel

Keith Hufnagel grew up skateboarding in the streets of New York City's late-80s. In 1992, he moved to San Francisco to pursue his passion for skateboarding and turned professional for Real Skateboards soon after, providing him a rare and rewarding opportunity to travel the world by means of his skateboard and the industry that supported him. Brought up by the 'do-it-yourself' approach of skateboarding, Keith saw a chance to give back to the community that had raised him, and in 2002 opened a small boutique in San Francisco's Tenderloin District, which he named HUF. The shop became a meeting point for Bay Area skateboarders and tourists the world over, and brought together under one roof the most respected brands that the skateboard, streetwear, and sneaker communities had to offer. With its rapid growth and popularity, Keith launched his own collection, HUF, assimilating into one label what he felt epitomized skateboarding-lifestyle and its associated countercultures. Since its inception, HUF has evolved into a world-renowned manufacturer of premium apparel, footwear, and skateboarding goods.

Currently based out of Los Angeles, Keith remains extremely involved in the production and direction of HUF. He continues to travel the world on his skateboard with his friends and teams, which helps fuel and inspire his original vision.

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Tom Campion

Tom Campion co-founded Zumiez in Seattle in 1978. From the beginning he has developed a culture of empowerment, competition and learning that has helped grow the company into the largest action sports lifestyle retailer in the world. More than 5,000 employees are a part of that culture today, selling apparel and hardgoods rooted in youth counterculture as expressed through music, art, fashion and the action sports lifestyle.

Zumiez’ successful public offering in 2005 enabled Tom to start the Campion Foundation to leverage the success of Zumiez for social and environmental policy change. Tom serves on the boards of theAlaska Wilderness League and Conservation Northwest, and is a producer of To The Arctic with MacGillivray Freeman Films. He still serves as chairman of Zumiez and is actively involved in building the culture of the company for further growth and expansion.

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P.Rod

Paul “P Rod” Rodriguez is well respected for his technical mastery on a skateboard and has been called “one of those few skaters who is born to skate” by many of his peers.

In 2005, Nike SB released it’s first signature model skateboard shoe, the Zoom Air Paul Rodriguez, making Paul the first skateboarder with a Nike pro model skateboard shoe. Paul is not only one of the marque faces of Nike Skateboarding, but has continued to grow with Nike through his multiple pro model shoes releases and Nike capsule apparel line.

In 2008 Paul launched Primitive, his Woodland Hills skateboard and sneaker shop, proving he is not only a skateboarder – but an entrepreneur.

Paul is a four time X Games Gold Medalist has been on the podium at every major contest in skateboarding. He is looked at by his peers and sponsors as a true professional in every sense of the word.

For having success at such a young age Paul remains very focused and grounded.

Paul’s sponsors include Nike SB, Mountain Dew, Target, Venture Trucks, Incase, Nixon, Andale Bearings, Fuse Science, Markisa, Primitive and Diamond Supply Company.

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Nas

“So much to write and say/Yo, I don’t know where to start/So I’ll begin with the basics and flow from the heart” – Nas, “Loco-Motive”

Hip-hop is a fickle, ephemeral beast; a genre filled with trend-hopping “artists,” corporate hucksters and walking gimmicks desperate to achieve their 15 minutes of shine. Look back at the hip-hop charts 20 years ago—hell, look back 10—and see how many names you’re still reading about today.

Ever since a 17-year-old Nasir Bin Olu Dara Jones appeared on Main Source’s 1991 classic “Live at the Barbeque,” hip-hop would be irrevocably changed. Nas. Gifted poet. Confessor. Agitator. Metaphor master. Street’s disciple. Political firebrand. Tongue-twisting genius. With music in his blood courtesy of famed blues musician father Olu Dara, the self-taught trumpeter attracted crowds with his playing at age 4, wrote his first verse at age 7 and, with 1994’s Illmatic, created one of the greatest hip-hop albums of all time before he could legally drink. Two decades on, Nas remains an incendiary, outspoken and brutally candid rapper on the recently released Life is Good, his tenth album and sixth to debut at the top of the Billboard 200.

Critics and fans immediately flocked to Life is Good, with everyone from Rolling Stone (“He cuts his rhymes with midlife realism and daring empathy”) and MTV (“The most emotionally raw record he’s made since his first”) to HipHopDX (“An obvious maturation from the veteran”) and Pitchfork (“Best New Music”) praising the album. Far from divorcing personal problems from a hyperbolic, caricatured alter ego, Life is Good finds Nas confronting the myriad issues he’s faced head-on since 2008′s Untitled (“Daughters, “Bye Baby”), mixed with a wayward wisdom that allows him to channel the past without attempting to ape it (“Loco-Motive,” “Nasty”).

“I used to listen to that Red Alert and Rap Attack/I fell in love with all that poetry/Mastered that” – Nas, “The Don”

Before the 11 Grammy nominations, seven platinum albums and Top 5 rankings on MTV’s 10 Greatest MCs of All Time and The Source’s Top 50 Lyricists of All Time, 17-year-old Nas would take daily trips to Manhattan hoping to secure a major label deal, only to be shot down by nearly every label. When 3rd Bass co-founder MC Serch brought his demo tape to the attention of Faith Newman, then-Director of A&R for Columbia Records, she made a deal with Serch that day, offering Nas a $17,000 advance and the lifeline to begin his career.

With hundreds of thousands of words alongside entire books written on the album, it seems almost trite today to discuss the universal impact and acclaim that Illmatic had on rap. Put simply: the album has long been considered a masterpiece not just in hip hop, but music as a whole, inspiring countless subsequent rappers and establishing Nas as the most vivid storyteller of urban life since Rakim and Chuck D.

1996’s It Was Written built upon Illmatic’s foundation, with “Street Dreams” and “If I Ruled the World” (the latter with Lauryn Hill) becoming radio staples and vaulting Nas into mainstream success. For his two 1999 albums, I Am… and Nastradamus, the rapper balanced commercial aspirations with extended metaphors and rough street anthems, carving out multiple identities that better reflected the rapper’s expanded worldview.

“My success symbolizes loyalty/Great friends/Dedication/Hard work/Routine builds character/In a world full of snakes, rats and scavengers” – Nas, “You Wouldn’t Understand”

In 2001, the rapper released his fifth album Stillmatic at the height of his escalating battle with Jay-Z for King of New York. Tracks like “Ether” and “Got Ur Self A….”could be heard on radio stations and in cars across the country and would eventually sell more than 2 million copies, while songs like “Rewind,” which told the story of a payback hit in reverse a la Memento, solidified Nas as an atypical rapper unafraid to play with convention. God’s Son, with the booming anthem “Made You Look,” would follow one year later and go gold.

As Nas entered his 30s, his scope and breadth became even more ambitious. While most rappers struggle to say anything on one album, Nas released the 2004 double album Street’s Disciple, reuniting with his estranged father on the blues/hip-hop hybrid “Bridging the Gap.” The album also featured the Iron Butterfly-sampling “Thief’s Theme,” which remains one of Nas’ most anthemic songs.
In the past decade, Nas has only gotten more inflammatory and passionate, purposely titling albums to provoke weighty discussions on a global level. 2006’s Hip Hop is Dead sparked widespread debate on the veracity of the title, while Nas changed 2008’s Untitled from its original title Nigger, yet still incited intense polemics on race and politics in America.

“Reveal my life/You will forgive me/You will love me/Hate me/Judge me/Relate to me/Only a few will/This how it sounds when you too real/They think it’s just music still” – Nas, “No Introduction”

In recent years, though, Nas has transcended mere rapper status and engaged in greater levels of philanthropy. The rapper is an avid UNICEF supporter, helping to raise funds for East African region Horn of Africa and teaming up with the family of George Harrison for the organization’s Month of Giving. The rapper also donated all proceeds of Distant Relatives, his 2010 collaboration with longtime friend Damian Marley, to help end poverty in Africa.

Nas’s desire for greater interaction with his fans has also led him to new business ventures. He serves on the board of social photo sharing site The Fancy alongside Twitter founder Jack Dorsey and Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes. The rapper also became a founding member and launched the lifestyle site 12 Society, which allows fans to receive a monthly shipment of clothes and gear hand-picked by the rapper.

Rapper J-Live once said satirically, “To be a great MC, you have to be a great liar.” It’s safer to not tell the truth; safer to sanitize your existence; safer to align yourself with the producer du jour; safer to rhyme about tropes over truths. Nas’s catalog speaks for itself. Over 10 albums, the rapper has never been one to play it safe. Whether it’s rhyming about politics, hip hop, race, religion, other artists or personal relationships, Nas has consistently brought unparalleled and unprecedented levels of honesty to hip hop, a trait often overlooked in the genre. On Life is Good’s “Reach Out,” Nas rhymes, “So call me a genius/If you didn’t/Now that I said it/I force you to think it.” For most artists, this would be arrogance bordering on hubris. For Nas, who’s remained vital and relevant for nearly 20 years, it’s just fact.

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